Prepare For The Rise In Mortgage Rates

 

iLeads Mortgage Market Minute

Welcome back to iLeads Mortgage Market Minute, where we bring you the latest, most relevant news regarding the mortgage market. We hope you enjoyed last week’s edition where we talked about How One Lender Is Tackling Demand For Jumbo Loans In 2021. This week we’re bringing you:

 

Three reasons there won’t be a 2021 housing market crash*

Housing bubble boys should take the year off

2020 came, and with it COVID-19. Five weeks into the crisis, demand in the U.S. housing market bottomed and then after about nine weeks, began to climb again, with purchase applications making a full V-shaped recovery by early June. The housing bubble boys had those five glorious weeks when it finally looked like the market would succumb to their dire predictions of a housing crash. That is not much time to hawk a book, website, newsletter or what-have-you, but I guess one has to make hay where the sun don’t shine – or however that goes.

Now, in the first weeks of 2021, it’s like de ja vu all over again. Our friendly neighborhood bubble boys are hawking a 2021 housing crash, citing as evidence the moderation of some housing data metrics that inevitably follow parabolic increases. But they see these moderations back to trend as the harbingers of a housing crash that will send home prices back to 1996 levels in a short time.

Remember, all housing bubble boys have to believe that prices go back to the start of the original bubble, hence the marketing of housing bubble 2.0.

Read more in-depth here.

 

Fannie Mae increases 2021 economic growth forecast*

But GSEs predict housing activity will slow

Fannie Mae‘s latest forecast projects economic growth to hit 5.3% in 2021, an increase of 0.8 percentage points from what the government-sponsored enterprise projected last month.

The forecasted growth is significantly more than the revised numbers for 2020, which Fannie Mae projects will end up as a 2.7% contraction. The company said the economy will see an especially strong uptick in the spring months, with the expansion of COVID-19 vaccination efforts and the warmer weather.

“COVID-19 remains the dominant force altering the path of the economy through the behaviors of people, businesses and policy makers,” said Doug Duncan, Fannie Mae senior vice president and chief economist. “Therefore, the best policy for economic recovery is the broad distribution of an effective vaccine, which is underway. The sooner this can be successfully accomplished the sooner growth can accelerate, and our thought is that by mid-year vaccine distribution efforts will be well-established, allowing for a strong second half.”

But even as overall economic growth accelerates, Fannie Mae said housing growth could slow over the next year. The company’s Economic and Strategic Research Group expects home sales to rise by 3.8% in 2021, with the monthly pace slowing throughout the year. Purchase mortgage originations are expected to rise to $1.8 trillion in 2021, up from the projected $1.6 trillion in 2020, while refinance originations could reach $2.2 trillion in 2021, down from a projected all-time high of $2.8 trillion in 2020.

“Our latest forecast projects that the continued waning of pent-up demand from last year’s delayed spring homebuying season, coupled with a modest rise in interest rates, will likely slow the pace of housing, measured both by the volume of mortgages refinanced and by the pace of home sales,” Duncan said. “However, in our view, a modest slowdown in the sales pace is unlikely to prevent year-end 2021 home sales from being higher than 2020.”

Read more in-depth here.

 

Freddie Sees Mortgage Originations Contracting Nearly 20% in 2021*

Freddie Mac’s first quarter 2021 economic forecast is unusually short, and, unlike recent forecasts from either of the GSEs, has relatively few revisions. The company’s economists say that nearly a year after the first cases of COVID-19 were diagnosed in the U.S., economic growth remains uncertain, with answers largely hinging on the roll-out of the new vaccines. The labor market remains weak with close to 20 million collecting unemployment insurance. December’s job losses, the first since last April, didn’t change the unemployment rate from 6.7 percent because labor participation also declined.

Record low mortgage rates continued to carry the housing market during the turmoil of the pandemic. At the end of the first week of 2021, the 30-year rate hit 2.65 percent, a new low. Freddie Mac expects the low interest rate environment to continue through both this year and next, averaging 2.9 percent through this end of this year and 3.2 percent in 2022.

Along with the low rates, the demand for housing has also been supported by the ability of workers to do so remotely. Sales in 2020 reached levels last seen in 2006. Annualized sales hit 7.6 million in the fourth quarter with strong showings from both new and existing home sales. Freddie Mac forecasts total home sales to be 6.8 million in the first quarter of 2021 and to average 6.5 million for the full year.

Read more in-depth here.

 

Continued Gains for November Single-Family Permits*

Over the first eleven months of 2020, total single-family permits issued year-to-date (YTD) nationwide reached 888,217. On a year-over-year (YoY) basis, this is an 12.2% increase over the November 2019 level of 791,452.

 

Permits-Regions

Year-to-date ending in November, single-family permits across the four regions ranged from an increase of 14.4% in the South to an increase of 8.0% in the Northeast. In multifamily permits, all four regions reported declines; West (-10.7%), Northeast (-10.5%), South (-8.6%), and the Midwest (-1.9%).

Between November 2019 YTD and November 2020 YTD, 45 states saw growth in single-family permits issued while five states and the District of Columbia registered a decline. Vermont recorded the highest growth rate during this time at 37.8% from 865 to 1,192 while single-family permits in the District of Columbia declined by 19.6%, from 163 in 2019 to 131 in 2020. The 10 states issuing the highest number of single-family permits combined accounted for 61.3% of the total single-family permits issued.

Read more in-depth here.

 

Prepare for the rise in mortgage rates*

Economists weigh in on how a modest rise in rates will play out in 2021

As the calendar flipped to 2021, it didn’t take long for the rise in mortgage rates. Just two weeks into the new year, Freddie Mac reported that mortgage rates climbed 14 basis points to 2.79%, a dramatic contrast to 2020, a year in which mortgage rates set record lows 16 times.

Economists across the housing industry believe the era of extreme low rates could be coming to a close, but the transition might be a slow burn.

Freddie Mac’s quarterly forecast estimates that the average 30-year fixed-rate mortgage will be 2.9% in 2021 and 3.2% in 2022. However, the factors that will drive mortgage rate movements are still up for debate.

HousingWire spoke to several economists in the housing industry to get their take on how high mortgage rates will climb in 2021, how lenders will respond, and what impact this will have on the housing market.

What the Fed giveth, can also taketh away.

Read more in-depth here.

 

Finding highly affordable leads to keep sales coming in

At iLeads, we have many great solutions for mortgage LO’s at a low cost. If you’d like to see how we can help you bring in consistent sales for a great price, give us a call at (877) 245-3237!

We’re free and are taking phone-calls from 7AM to 5PM PST, Monday through Friday.

You can also schedule a call here.

Get Started

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    The Insurance Impacts Of Biden’s ‘180-degree’ Approach

    ileads insurance market minute

     

    Welcome to iLeads Insurance Market Minute, where we bring you the latest, most relevant news regarding the insurance market. Last week you were reading Insurers Rethink Client And Broker Strategies Heading Into 2021. This week we’re bringing you:

     

    Lemonade CEO says insurance is going through a massive shift as it transitions to digital platforms*

    Find out more in-depth here.

     

    Unemployment, workers comp premium to recover ‘slowly’: NCCI*

    U.S. employment — and related total workers compensation premium — is likely to recover more slowly this year than it did during the summer and fall of 2020, according to an economic outlook report issued Wednesday by the National Council on Compensation Insurance.

    U.S. employment recovered in every month from April to November 2020, but the pace of recovery slowed to near zero in the 4th quarter, according to the report, which noted the total number of unemployed increased modestly from November to December.

    At year-end 2020, four out of five lost jobs were concentrated in service sectors, characterized by high physical proximity and low essentiality, and two out of five lost jobs were in leisure and hospitality, according to the report.

    Risks in 2021 include an increasing share of permanent layoffs, economic distress among low-wage earners and small businesses, and a massive virus resurgence, the report said.

    Read more in-depth here.

     

    The insurance impacts of Biden’s ‘180-degree’ approach*

    With Joe Biden taking office today (January 20), a few policies in the US are sure to change, including the administration’s approach to climate change.

    The president-elect has said that he plans to reverse former President Donald Trump’s policies on items like withdrawing from the Paris climate agreement and weakening protections against environmental pollution. On the latter point, Biden has proposed a $2 trillion push to slow global warming by pulling back the burning of fossil fuels, while also aiming to make the United States’ power plants, vehicles, mass transport systems, and buildings more fuel efficient and less dependent on oil, gas and coal, according to reports.

    The implications of this approach, as well as several other factors that have already been developing in the United States, will be meaningful for the insurance industry in several ways.

    For one, a legal expert predicts that 2021 “will see the heat turned up” on companies and executives around the world via climate change litigation, which has been underpinned by rising concerns around global warming.

    “There’s been a marked increase in notifications to insurers over the last three years or so,” said Emma Ager (pictured above), partner at Clyde & Co. “There has been a lot of litigation in the US against oil majors [coming] from climate change groups. The oil majors in particular have been notifying their insurers when those lawsuits have been coming in, and they’re gathering steam in the US.”

    In addition to the main climate change lawsuits against big oil companies, Clyde & Co is also seeing more claims stemming from indirect climate change impacts. For example, explained Ager, the past few years have seen many damaging wildfires and hurricanes in the US that have been driven by changes in climate. These events are in turn driving an increase in litigation – and that’s not even touching on changing environmental regulations that will likely also have an impact on insureds from an environmental perspective.

    Find out more in-depth here.

     

    Finding highly affordable leads to keep sales coming in

    At iLeads, we have many great solutions for insurance agents at a low cost. If you’d like to see how we can help you bring in consistent sales for a great price, give us a call at (877) 245-3237!

    We’re free and are taking phone-calls from 7AM to 5PM PST, Monday through Friday.

    You can also schedule a call here.

    Get Started

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      How One Lender Is Tackling Demand For Jumbo Loans In 2021

       

      iLeads Mortgage Market Minute

      Welcome back to iLeads Mortgage Market Minute, where we bring you the latest, most relevant news regarding the mortgage market. We hope you enjoyed last week’s edition where we talked about Will We Have A Buyer’s Housing Market in 2021?. This week we’re bringing you:

       

      What bonds are telling us about the housing market*

      Even with the drama of the past week, the markets didn’t blink

      Think of the markets as capitalist soothsayers. They do not abide by partisan politics, social mores or ethics. They do not care who is president. The markets react to what has the potential to make money for companies, good or bad, and what has the potential to prevent companies from making money. Also, whether they believe there will be economic and housing market growth.

      This is why even though we have suffered great drama in the past week, the markets didn’t blink. Consider:

      Hospitalizations due to COVID-19 are at seven-day average record highs;
      COVID-19 deaths are at seven-day average record highs;
      The U.S. capital was under siege while congressional members were in chambers;
      And the U.S. jobs report was negative 140,000 jobs for the first time since April.
      It’s been a bumpy (horrendous) start to the year, but the markets see sunny days ahead. In the same week that we experienced a real-life horror show, the 10-year not only broke over 1% for the first time since the beginning of COVID, but also ended the week with much higher yields!

      My “America is Back” economic and housing market model needed the 10-year yield to get to 1% in 2020, and we got as high as 0.99% before the year ended. What happened with the 10-year yield last week was a material change in the market and one that I believe is an accurate indicator of better economic times ahead.

      Read more in-depth here.

       

      Tentative Recovery in Mortgage Availability With Help From Government and Jumbo Loans*

      While it did dip a bit last month, the availability of mortgage credit appears to be stabilizing, having moved only slightly over the last three months. The Mortgage Bankers Association’s (MBA’s) Mortgage Credit Availability Index (MCAI) was down 0.1 percent in December, to a reading of 122.1. A decline in the MCAI indicates that lending standards are tightening, while increases in the index are indicative of loosening credit.

      The MCAI was at 181.3 in February 2020 as news of the pandemic broke. It declined by 16.1 percent in March and another 12.2 percent in April. Subsequent smaller decreases ultimately took the index to 118.6 in September before it began what is so far a hesitant recovery.

       

      The index has four components based on loan types. The Conventional MCAI decreased 2.8 percent in December while the Government MCAI increased by 2.1 percent. Of the component indices of the Conventional MCAI, the Jumbo MCAI increased by 1.4 percent, and the Conforming MCAI fell by 7.2 percent.

      Read more in-depth here.

       

      Forbearance rate falls to mid-April levels*

      However, there have now been eleven consecutive weeks forbearance portfolio share has hovered between 5 and 6%

      The U.S. forbearance rate fell seven basis points last week to 5.46% of servicer’s portfolio volume, according to a survey from the Mortgage Bankers Association on Monday. As of last week’s data set, forbearance portfolio share is now below numbers Black Knight reported in mid-April of 2020.

      Every investor class managed to see a decline in rate, with Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac once again claiming the smallest forbearance rate at 3.19%.

      Ginnie Mae loans in forbearance, which include loans backed by the Federal Housing Administration, have fluctuated greatly in the past several months and fell seven basis points to 7.85%. Although portfolio loans and private-label securities (PLS) experienced the greatest decline after a 10 basis point drop, they still held the largest rate at 8.77%.

      Overall, forbearances are decreasing, but the speed at which they are declining is beginning to slow. Last week marked the eleventh consecutive week servicers portfolios have hovered between 5% and 6% – the longest a percentage range has held since the survey’s origins in May.

      While it arrives as positive news that forbearances are once again descending, economists worry that the length at which borrowers remain in forbearance may become troublesome.

      “The data show that those homeowners who remain in forbearance are more likely to be in distress, with fewer continuing to make any payments and fewer exiting forbearance each month,” said Mike Fratantoni, MBA’s senior vice president and chief economist.

      Read more in-depth here.

       

      How one lender is tackling demand for jumbo loans in 2021*

      Acra Lending remains committed to supporting borrowers’ needs across the market

      Following its rebrand from Citadel Servicing Corp. to Acra Lending, the company has also launched a new jumbo prime program. HousingWire recently spoke with Keith Lind, Acra executive chairman and president, and Acra CEO Kyle Gunderlock, about the new program and how it will help borrowers in 2021 and beyond.

      HousingWire: Why did you develop the Jumbo Prime program?

      Keith Lind: This specific program has been developed to meet the needs of customers in today’s environment. We wanted to introduce a program that provides borrowers with the larger loan amounts they need to purchase or refinance a high-value property. We have been working non-stop to provide programs through our retail, wholesale and correspondent channels, which have significant demand in the marketplace.

      Kyle Gunderlock: The addition of this program demonstrates our commitment in identifying, responding to and anticipating the needs of borrowers across the market. We have always set high standards and our team works diligently on a daily basis to continue to maintain responsible lending practices as the foundation of our business.

      Read more in-depth here.

       

      Finding highly affordable leads to keep sales coming in

      At iLeads, we have many great solutions for mortgage LO’s at a low cost. If you’d like to see how we can help you bring in consistent sales for a great price, give us a call at (877) 245-3237!

      We’re free and are taking phone-calls from 7AM to 5PM PST, Monday through Friday.

      You can also schedule a call here.

      Get Started

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        Insurers Rethink Client And Broker Strategies Heading Into 2021

         

        ileads insurance market minute

         

        Welcome to iLeads Insurance Market Minute, where we bring you the latest, most relevant news regarding the insurance market. Last week you were reading Mandatory Vaccine Policies May Have Workers Comp Implications. This week we’re bringing you:

         

        Insurance brokers sue over discrimination*

        Three insurance brokers in Baltimore, MD have filed complaints with the state regulator over allegations that an insurance company is discriminating against the predominantly Black neighborhoods in the city.

        All three brokerages – Baltimore Insurance Network, Ross Insurance Agency, and Welsch Insurance Group – have accused Erie Insurance of engaging in insurance “redlining” of Black customers. Each of the brokerage firms filed separate complaints with the Maryland Insurance Administration this week, Baltimore Sun reported.

        The three brokerages contract or have contracted with Erie to serve as insurance agents in the city. Two of the three brokerages are also Black-owned businesses.

        Redlining refers to the practice of denying services to residents of particular neighborhoods based on race or ethnicity. The complaints by the brokerages accuse Erie of refusing to underwriter policies based on a potential client’s race, ethnic origin, neighborhood and/or socioeconomic status.

        Find out more in-depth here.

         

        Broker M&A activity increases modestly in 2020*

        Mergers and acquisitions in the insurance brokerage sector increased modestly to 754 deals announced in 2020, compared with 744 in 2019, according to a report Wednesday from S&P Inc.

        Meanwhile, M&A activity decreased in the underwriting sector to 151 transactions announced in 2020, down from 165 in 2019, S&P said.

        Underwriting sector deal activity slowed in the last three months of 2020 to 40 deals compared with 46 in the third quarter of 2020 and 47 in the fourth quarter of 2019. Fourth-quarter M&A activity in the property and casualty sector increased to 22 deals from 19 in the fourth-quarter 2019.

        In a separate report, analysts MarshBerry said there were 676 brokerage M&A transactions announced in the United States, up 4.3% increase over 2019’s of 648 announced transactions. MarshBerry noted that “the announced 676 transactions de facto occurred in only 10 months, as M&A activity was at a virtual stand-still for April and May.”

        Private capital-backed buyers completed 462, or 68.3%, of all announced transactions, MarshBerry said. Independent firms accounted for 90 of the 676 deals, 13.3%. The composition of the seller’s line of business remained “consistent” in 2020 with 50.3% property/casualty focused, 32.5% multiline and 17.2% in the employee benefits/consulting space.

        Read more in-depth here.

         

        Insurers rethink client and broker strategies heading into 2021*

        Over the course of 2020, the insurance industry and its various participants, from brokerages and agencies to insurtechs and carriers, have had to undergo a significant shift in how they do business, thanks to the coronavirus pandemic. Since the crisis is far from over, 2021 will likewise be colored by ongoing changes within insurance organizations as they continue to adapt to the new normal.

        During a panel at the Future of Insurance USA event, leaders from the industry sounded off on how their companies have changed so far, as well as what strategies and processes are helping them keep pace with the many developments in the marketplace.

        “We have this interesting hybrid approach to innovation. We use focus groups, and primary and secondary research like everyone else, but we have the advantage of having all of these financial representatives – our advisors – that are essentially running constant tests. They’re always trying to figure out what’s the best way to serve their clients, so we can tap into and leverage those on-the-ground insights,” said Christian W. Mitchell, EVP and chief customer officer at Northwestern Mutual.

        He added that Northwestern also holds a unique position in the market as a mutual company, in light of which, he noted, “We are in the process of thinking about what are the metrics to capture whether a client is better off having worked for us, as opposed to working for anyone else, and embedding that in our corporate metrics, what we report to the board on, and where we hold ourselves accountable.”

        Find out more in-depth here.

         

        Finding highly affordable leads to keep sales coming in

        At iLeads, we have many great solutions for insurance agents at a low cost. If you’d like to see how we can help you bring in consistent sales for a great price, give us a call at (877) 245-3237!

        We’re free and are taking phone-calls from 7AM to 5PM PST, Monday through Friday.

        You can also schedule a call here.

        Get Started

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          Will We Have A Buyer’s Housing Market in 2021?

           

          iLeads Mortgage Market Minute

           

          Welcome back to iLeads Mortgage Market Minute, where we bring you the latest, most relevant news regarding the mortgage market. We hope you enjoyed last week’s edition where we talked about What Happens When Borrowers Have More Control of the Lending Process?. This week we’re bringing you:

           

          FHFA announces 2021 plans to serve underserved areas*

          Plans include new product for manufactured housing

          The Federal Housing Finance Agency published the 2021 plans for Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac to serve the most vulnerable communities through their Duty to Serve plans.

          While these plans normally encompass three years – and would need to lay out the plan for years 2021 to 2023 – due to disruptions caused by the COVID-19 pandemic, the FHFA announced the government-sponsored enterprises would be releasing just one year – an extension of their 2018 to 2020 plans.

          Back in 2016, the FHFA issued a final rule that implemented the DTS provisions as mandated by the Housing and Economic Recovery Act of 2008. The statute requires the enterprises to serve three specified underserved markets – manufactured housing, affordable housing preservation and rural housing – by increasing the liquidity of mortgage financing for very low-, low- and moderate-income families.

          These are the areas the Duty to Serve plans target:

          Manufactured housing: Exploring financing options for one of the largest affordable housing opportunities
          Affordable housing preservation: Helping keep established affordable properties available as low-cost housing alternatives
          Rural housing: Supporting the financing of housing for targeted high-needs rural regions and populations
          In order to put together the priorities for their plans, the GSEs engaged in activities such as requests for comment, public roundtables, conferences, listening sessions and direct research.

          Read more in-depth here.

           

          The Average Family Can’t Afford To Own a Home in Most U.S. Counties, Study Finds*

          Want to buy a home? These days you’ll likely need to make more than an average salary to afford the monthly payments.

          A new report from property data firm Attom Data Solutions analyzed how affordable it is to be a homeowner across the country. Owning a home was affordable in 41% of counties nationwide as of the fourth quarter of 2020. The largest metropolitan areas where owning a home is still affordable for the average household include Chicago, Houston, Philadelphia, Cleveland and Tampa, Fla.

          To produce the report, researchers looked at the median home prices and average wage data across 499 counties nationwide. They calculated the cost of major homeownership expenses—mortgage payments, taxes and insurance—for median-priced homes, assuming that there was a $100,000 loan in place.

          Read more in-depth here.

           

          Could 2% define mortgage rates for the next decade?*

          Mortgage rates have fallen from 12% in the 1980s

          The end of 2020 won’t necessarily mean saying goodbye to the favorable 2% mortgage rates that hit historically low levels 16 times over the past 12 months.

          In fact, most industry observers believe rates will remain at the same low levels in 2021 as the Federal Reserve uses low rates as a weapon to combat the economic effects of the COVID-19 pandemic.

          This means 2021 will still be a good time to purchase or refinance a home, according to Len Kiefer, Freddie Mac‘s deputy chief economist.

          “There’s certainly a risk that rates could head higher, but our baseline forecast has them remaining near record lows,” Kiefer said. “In that scenario, the pressure on housing markets will continue and it’s likely that we will continue to see strong house price growth, though perhaps not as red-hot as what we’ve had in recent months.”

          Even with interest rates falling more than a full percentage point in 2020, Kiefer said he believes the housing market would have still enjoyed a strong second half of the year absent the record-low rates. But the statistics – record home sales and price growth – would not have been so “eye-poppingly strong,” he said.

          Read more in-depth here.

           

          Will we have a buyer’s housing market in 2021?*

          The days of spamming customers are coming to an end

          If you’re looking to buy a home, you’ll stand the best chance in a buyer’s housing market, where listings are flush, demand is low and buyers have the upper hand — not to mention most of the negotiating power.

          Seller’s markets, on the other hand, are on the opposite side of the spectrum. They’re marked by high levels of competition and rising home prices, and in most cases, you’ll have a harder (and more expensive) time finding a home.

          For most of America, we saw the latter conditions in 2020, with buyers facing unprecedented competition and increasingly out-of-reach home prices for much of the year.

          Will 2021 be more of the same? Let’s take a look.

          A buyer’s housing market in 2021?
          It’s not likely we’ll see a buyer’s housing market in 2021, at least according to experts. Most major players are projecting home prices to rise, and while strong construction could put more inventory on the market, it likely won’t be enough to tip the scales in buyers’ favors.

          With that said, it does seem like buyers will see some relief at some point. For example, home prices are still expected to rise in 2021, but at a smaller pace than we saw in 2020. Freddie Mac projects prices to rise only 2.6% — much better than 2020’s 5.5% clip.

          Read more in-depth here.

           

          Finding highly affordable leads to keep sales coming in

          At iLeads, we have many great solutions for mortgage LO’s at a low cost. If you’d like to see how we can help you bring in consistent sales for a great price, give us a call at (877) 245-3237!

          We’re free and are taking phone-calls from 7AM to 5PM PST, Monday through Friday.

          You can also schedule a call here.

          Get Started

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            Mandatory Vaccine Policies May Have Workers Comp Implications

             

            ileads insurance market minute

            Welcome to iLeads Insurance Market Minute, where we bring you the latest, most relevant news regarding the insurance market. Last week you were reading Professional Liability Market Is “a Game of Whack-a-Mole Now”. This week we’re bringing you:

             

            Should agents shake in their boots at GM’s move into auto insurance?*

            Last year in auto insurance finished with a bang after General Motors (GM) announced that it was getting back into the sector with the launch of OnStar Insurance, a business powered by the technology of the GM subsidiary and connected car services company OnStar. GM also revealed a new insurance agency, OnStar Insurance Services, that will be the exclusive agent for OnStar Insurance.

            It’s a smart move to get back into the auto game, says one expert, who also shed some light on what this development means for agents working in the auto insurance space.

            “What has changed from the last time that GM went into auto insurance … is that they now have this massive amount of information from the vehicles themselves, and that information can help drive usage-based insurance,” said Insurance Technologies Corporation (ITC) CEO Laird Rixford (pictured). “But this is nothing unique – Ford does it with Nationwide … and insurance agents should not be worried about this, because the same things that allowed them to survive and thrive before, whenever GM was offering insurance directly, is the same thing that is happening now – and that is the ability for them to provide choice.”

            Find out more in-depth here.

             

            MJ Insurance analyses the impact of COVID-19 on employer medical plans*

            The COVID-19 pandemic has had a huge impact on employer-sponsored health plans. While it would be easy to assume that medical spend increased in 2020 due to the amount of people needing urgent care as a result of the coronavirus pandemic, the opposite is in fact true.

            A whitepaper published in November by MJ Insurance, one of the largest privately-held insurance agencies in America, details how medical claims, medical spend and the use of medical services are all down significantly year over year. The analysis in the paper, entitled ‘The Impact of COVID-19 on Employer Medical Plans’, is based on MJ’s book of business alongside data sets made publicly available since the start of the pandemic.

            The report shows that while total enrollment into employer medical plans has remained flat, overall use of medical services has reduced by 16% year over year. Furthermore, emergency room (ER) utilization has gone down by 26%, and primary care visits have plunged by 74%. This is largely because many people have been following government-mandated ‘stay at home’ orders; they’re avoiding leaving home whenever possible – and that includes making trips to see a physician for non-urgent medical needs. People are delaying care – including physical exams, surgery and elective procedures – because they don’t want to risk getting exposed to the virus. Telemedicine and emergency virtual care options have also impacted the trend toward reduced healthcare spending.

            Read more in-depth here.

             

            Mandatory vaccine policies may have workers comp implications*

            The COVID-19 vaccine rollout has begun in health care and senior living facilities across the U.S., and employers in many industries are eagerly awaiting the chance to have their employees vaccinated against the coronavirus.

            However, employers must balance their desire for a safe workplace with the risks of requiring vaccinations and the potential workers compensation implications if a worker experiences serious side effects, experts say.

            Employers “need to recognize that if they do impose a vaccination mandate that it’s likely that they are going to have to pay for the vaccination, that this will be compensable work time, and … medical complications in a mandatory vaccination environment are going to be under workers compensation and be covered,” said Gary Pearce, Detroit-based chief risk architect at risk management consultancy Aclaimant Inc.

            While government agencies including the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission and the Occupational Safety and Health Administration have said that employers can mandate that workers receive the COVID-19 vaccine, it may not be the best approach, said attorney Jeff Adelson, partner with Newport Beach, California, firm Adelson McLean P.C.

            Find out more in-depth here.

             

            Finding highly affordable leads to keep sales coming in

            At iLeads, we have many great solutions for insurance agents at a low cost. If you’d like to see how we can help you bring in consistent sales for a great price, give us a call at (877) 245-3237!

            We’re free and are taking phone-calls from 7AM to 5PM PST, Monday through Friday.

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              What Happens When Borrowers Have More Control of the Lending Process?

               

              iLeads Mortgage Market Minute

              Welcome back to iLeads Mortgage Market Minute, where we bring you the latest, most relevant news regarding the mortgage market. We hope you enjoyed last week’s edition where we talked about How To Grow Housing Market Supply In 2021. This week we’re bringing you:

               

              Mortgage Rates Barely Higher For Some; Lower For Others*

              What do you get when you add a modest amount of cost to the average mortgage rate from last Friday? Rates that are still effectively right in line with all-time lows. In fact, most borrowers will not see any major differences in loan quotes between the two days. If anything, the upfront costs would be microscopically higher or the lender credit could be slightly lower.

              Lenders who maintained the same loan pricing throughout the day are those doing the most to contribute to the “slightly higher” thesis. But many lenders responded to friendlier bond market conditions and made token adjustments in the middle of the day (in your favor). If we were only measuring that cohort, we’d instead be observing rates that are sideways to slightly lower versus Friday.

              Read more in-depth here.

               

              Mortgage Rates Holding Near All-Time Lows Ahead of The Fed*

              Mortgage rates were mixed today, depending on the lender. The bond market–the driving force behind interest rate movement–was stronger yesterday. Many mortgage lenders thought it was strong enough to justify mid-day improvements in mortgage rates. Those lenders were the ones generally offering modestly higher rates today. Conversely, lenders who abstained yesterday were able to offer slightly better terms today. All told, the average lender is roughly unchanged with 30yr fixed rates that remain very close to true all-time lows.

              Tomorrow brings the week’s biggest risks with important economic data in the morning and an even more important announcement from the Federal Reserve in the afternoon. Although this is a regularly scheduled Fed announcement, there’s been ample speculation about a change to the Fed’s bond-buying program. The change in question involves adjusting the balance of bond purchases in favor of longer-term debt. In other words, the Fed wouldn’t spend any more money, but they’d be buying longer-term bonds. This would have a positive effect on longer-term rates like mortgages and 10yr Treasury yields, provided the Fed pulls the trigger.

              Read more in-depth here.

               

              New home applications drop in November*

              But year-over-year purchases up, according to survey

              New home purchases in November 2020 increased 34.7% from a year ago, but new home applications decreased from October, according to the Mortgage Bankers Association builder application survey.

              New home applications decreased 16% from October, said Joel Kan, MBA associate vice president of economic and industry forecasting.

              “November new home sales activity, both mortgage applications, and home sales ran at a pace considerably ahead of 2019, showing the ongoing strong growth in housing demand and new residential construction,” Kan said. “Signs of a slowdown in the economic recovery likely contributed to the expected monthly decrease in activity.”

              The average loan size of new homes increased from $355,684 in October to $357,554 in November, according to the survey.

              New, single-family home sales were running at a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 827,000 units in November 2020, based on data from the survey. The seasonally adjusted estimate for November is a decrease of 10.8% from the October pace of 927,000 units.

              On an unadjusted basis, MBA estimates that there were 59,000 new home sales in November 2020, a decrease of 15.7% from 70,000 new home sales in October.

              Read more in-depth here.

               

              Behavioral shopping data signals purchase intent 100 days prior to credit trigger*

              The days of spamming customers are coming to an end

              As interest rates continue to stay well below 3% with no end in sight, lenders are faced with consumer demand from all corners of the housing market. From refis to first-time-homebuyers in the beginning stages of their search, consumer interest has certainly been piqued by low rates and is only growing stronger.

              To help lenders navigate through a sea of refis and potential purchases, fintech companies like Jornaya are adding value by providing behavioral data that informs lenders when their consumers are visiting mortgage-related websites. “With behavioral data, lenders can see which of their consumers are in-market…around 100 days prior to a credit trigger or an MLS trigger and up to 180 days before a closed loan,” said Mike Eshelman, VP of Consumer Finance at Jornaya, a 2020 Tech100 Mortgage recipient.

              According to Eshelman, the use of behavioral data can tell lenders exactly which customers are actively visiting mortgage shopping sites. These behavioral shopping signals are the earliest signs available indicating a customer has started their mortgage shopping journey.

              We reached out to Eshelman to learn more about how behavioral data is transforming the way lenders market to consumers and what the customer experience will look like in 2021.

              HousingWire: Leveraging behavioral data has transformed marketing and consumer experiences across industries. What are some examples of the most impactful uses of behavioral data in the housing industry?

              Mike Eshelman: Reaching the exact right consumer sooner with personalized messaging. With behavioral data, lenders can see which of their consumers are in-market, and how active they are shopping, around 100 days prior to a credit trigger or an MLS trigger and up to 180 days before a closed loan.

              Read more in-depth here.

               

              What happens when borrowers have more control of the lending process?*

              FormFree’s blockchain-based exchange gives consumers access to their own ‘Financial DNA’

              Through every financial transaction in a person’s life — whether a mortgage, auto, student, or personal loan — there is one constant: the borrower.

              Yet borrowers have had limited agency in the lending process to date. Lenders have always controlled access to borrowers’ ability to pay (ATP) information and, by extension, the transaction as a whole. And because lenders only collect borrower data at a specific point in time — typically, during loan qualification or underwriting — their understanding of a consumer’s ATP has a limited shelf life.

              FormFree, the ATP fintech led by HousingWire Tech Trendsetter Brent Chandler, is launching a blockchain-based exchange for consumers to take control of the lending process. The idea behind the distributed ledger technology, called FormFree Chain, is to provide faster close times and more choice for both loan seekers and lenders by giving consumers access to their own Financial DNA. Financial DNA is a real-time, composite view of an individual’s ATP based on asset, employment, identity, income, credit, and public records data retrieved directly from financial institutions and other authoritative sources.

              Had a blockchain like FormFree’s been in place in the early days of the COVID-19 pandemic, it could have helped avert future lender losses and credit issues, according to Faith Schwartz, who led the HOPE NOW alliance during the 2008 crisis. She now leads advisory firm Housing Finance Strategies and is a member of FormFree’s board of directors.

              “When the pandemic forced a shutdown of the economy, Congress gave blanket permission for any affected consumer to place their mortgage in forbearance,” Schwartz said. “Lenders had no visibility into the actual financial state of borrowers requesting forbearance, and as a result many lenders and investors found themselves bearing additional risk. In a world where borrowers provide lenders their up-to-the-minute ATP, modifications or workout solutions could be granted in a more sustainable manner that’s based on the borrower’s true financial condition.”

              Read more in-depth here.

               

              Finding highly affordable leads to keep sales coming in

              At iLeads, we have many great solutions for mortgage LO’s at a low cost. If you’d like to see how we can help you bring in consistent sales for a great price, give us a call at (877) 245-3237!

              We’re free and are taking phone-calls from 7AM to 5PM PST, Monday through Friday.

              You can also schedule a call here.

              Get Started

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                Professional Liability Market Is “a Game of Whack-a-Mole Now”

                 

                ileads insurance market minute

                Welcome to iLeads Insurance Market Minute, where we bring you the latest, most relevant news regarding the insurance market. Last week you were reading Premium Renewal Rates Rise Across Major Commercial Lines: Ivans. This week we’re bringing you:

                 

                Alera predicts 2021 rate increases across several commercial lines*

                Alera Group Inc. forecasts rate increases across several lines of commercial insurance in its Property & Casualty 2021 Market Outlook released Wednesday.

                The broker said that in addition to broadly higher rates, “insurance buyers can expect to see increases in coverage exclusions along with higher retentions and deductibles.” In addition, renewals will likely take longer as insurers ask more questions and require additional data.

                Among major lines, property coverage rates are forecast to rise by 13.6% in 2021. Underwriters will prefer risks seen as having lower than average catastrophe exposure while those seen as “higher risk” should expect larger than average price increases as well as lower limits, Alera said.

                General liability is projected to rise 11.3% for “virtually all businesses,” Alera said. Tighter underwriting standards are likely and some classes of business, including contractors, municipalities, public utilities, manufacturers of “difficult products,” chemicals, and habitational real estate, may be offered less capacity.

                Find out more in-depth here.

                 

                Axis Insurance adds four senior E&S underwriters*

                Axis Insurance, the specialty insurance business of Axis Capital Holdings Ltd., said Wednesday it has named four senior underwriters to its U.S. excess and surplus property team.

                Cary Prewitt was named vice president and joins Axis from Liberty International Underwriters, where he was a vice president for excess and surplus, Axis said in a statement.

                Quinn McAleenan was named vice president and joins Axis from Ironshore Insurance, where he was an excess and surplus property underwriter.

                Bryan Paterson was named vice president. He was most recently an account executive officer in the large property unit at Travelers Insurance.

                Read more in-depth here.

                 

                Professional liability market is “a game of whack-a-mole now”*

                It’s no news flash that the professional liability market has faced several challenges this year as the hardening marketplace and coronavirus pandemic have converged, bringing substantial increases to financial and professional lines rates over the course of 2020 – but what does the professional lines reinsurance landscape look like at the moment?

                During a panel titled, “State of the Market: Financial Lines and Professional Liability Reinsurance,” at the 2020 PLUS Virtual Conference, experts currently working within the treaty reinsurance space who are focused on large diverse portfolios spoke about reinsurers’ views of the professional lines business. The first point made by one panelist was that he wouldn’t call this a hard market.

                “I know there’s a lot of dialogue around this, that this is a hard market – it is a transitionary market,” said Brian Finlay, who heads up North American management and professional treaty liability at Trans Re. “I think there’s a lot of pricing corruption that’s gone on for the past 10 years … [but] the rate is coming back into the market and I’m saying that this is not a hard market. A hard market is where you cannot get something done, [and right now] there is capacity out there – there’s reinsurance capacity, there is insurance capacity.”

                Read more in-depth here.

                 

                Finding highly affordable leads to keep sales coming in

                At iLeads, we have many great solutions for insurance agents at a low cost. If you’d like to see how we can help you bring in consistent sales for a great price, give us a call at (877) 245-3237!

                We’re free and are taking phone-calls from 7AM to 5PM PST, Monday through Friday.

                You can also schedule a call here.

                Get Started

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                  How To Grow Housing Market Supply In 2021

                   

                  iLeads Mortgage Market Minute

                  Welcome back to iLeads Mortgage Market Minute, where we bring you the latest, most relevant news regarding the mortgage market. We hope you enjoyed last week’s edition where we talked about The Downside Of The Hot 2020 Housing Market: Rapid Home-Price Growth. This week we’re bringing you:

                   

                  Even with low inventory, expect a strong 2021 housing market*

                  Homesnap expects the housing market to remain busy through springtime

                  Even prior to the pandemic, housing inventory had hit record lows, and the problem has only gotten worse as demand continues to rise. Total home sales are outpacing new listings by a wide margin every month, and real estate tech company Homesnap foresees the shortage continuing in 2021 unless more sellers enter the market.

                  The divide between supply and demand is striking: compared to last year, total new listings increased .22%, while total sales increased 19.29%. Homesnap said this trend could further drain inventory as 2021 approaches.

                  Home prices have risen as a result of the mismatch in homebuyer demand and housing inventory. The average list price for properties that sold rose 6.7% from September to October this year, which Homesnap said is significantly higher than the same figure in 2018 and 2019.

                  As median home prices keep rising, homeowners who originally planned to sell within the next three to five years might list their homes sooner, Homesnap said, freeing up more inventory.

                  Read more in-depth here.

                   

                  Refi Rates Are Finally Back to All-Time Lows*

                  For some lenders, it was last week. For others, it was today. After months of waiting and multiple successive reports of all-time lows from other sources, the average lender is now finally back in line with the actual all-time lows seen on August 4th, 2020.

                  If I’m telling you that, and other sources have told you other things, how do you know who’s right? Actually, everyone’s right, as long as you understand the limitations and implications of their respective methodology. I went into significant detail on that a few weeks back (click here to read the piece in question) but the key difference is that my mortgage rate tracking adjusts daily–sometimes several times a day–so it was better able to capture the ultra low rates on August whereas it was lost in the averaging methodologies of other data aggregators.

                  The other consideration is that I weight my rate tracking according to refi demand, and refis got noticeably more expensive with the roll-out of the new refi fee–something that happened briefly in mid-August, but then began in earnest in mid-September (even if you read articles that suggest the fee could have been avoided as recently as Nov 30th, they’re wrong, and I’m right… I super duper promise).

                  So did anything new and different happen today to cause a drop in rates?

                  No, not even a little bit. If anything, it would be more accurate to label today’s rates as ‘unchanged’ versus yesterday. And in general, they haven’t changed much all month. That’s impressive considering the rest of the bond market has undergone a normal amount of volatility. It’s also a testament to the uncommon set of considerations facing rates at the moment. Bottom line: they’re still much higher than the bond market says they need to be because lenders can’t handle the business that would come in the door if they dropped rates any faster.

                  Read more in-depth here.

                   

                  Fannie Mae reports housing market confidence drop*

                  First drop in three months

                  Following three months of increases, Fannie Mae’s Home Purchase Sentiment Index (HPSI), a composite index designed to track the housing market and consumer confidence to sell or buy a home, fell 1.7 points in November to 80. Year-over-year, the HPSI is down 11.5 points.

                  Senior Vice President and Chief Economist Doug Duncan points to consumer wariness around COVID-19 as reason for the sudden decline in housing market confidence.

                  “This follows the HPSI’s recovery of slightly more than half of the loss experienced during the first few months of the pandemic,” he said. “Purchase confidence has recovered more for homeowners than for renters, in part because homeowners have been less likely than renters to have had their jobs and finances impacted by the pandemic.”

                  Duncan added that the gap between homeowner and renter subgroups hit a survey-high in August, and remains “elevated and well-above the survey average” in November.

                  Read more in-depth here.

                   

                  Buyers and Sellers Divided as Pandemic Wears Down Housing Expectations*

                  After climbing for three straight months Fannie Mae’s Home Purchase Sentiment Index (HPSI) stalled in November, declining 1.7 points to 80.0. The index based on six questions from the National Housing Survey, was 11.5 points lower than in November 2019.

                   

                  The two most closely watched components of the index are those which measure consumers attitudes toward buying or selling a home and they diverged during the month. Those who thought it was a good time to buy dropped from 60 to 57 percent while those who said it was not a good time remained at 35 percent. This left the net good time responses at 22 percent, a 3-percentage point loss for the month and 10 points lower on an annual basis.

                  Selling sentiments moved in the opposite direction. The percentage saying it was a good time to sell remained at 59 percent while those responding on the negative side decreased 2 points. This left the net positive responses up 2 points at 26 percent. The component’s score is still down 14 points from November 2019.

                  “The HPSI appears to have peaked for now as consumers continue to consider how COVID-19 impacts their ability to buy or sell a home,” said Doug Duncan, Senior Vice President and Chief Economist. “This follows the HPSI’s recovery of slightly more than half of the loss experienced during the first few months of the pandemic.

                  “Drilling down a bit, home purchase confidence has recovered more for homeowners than for renters, in part because homeowners have been less likely than renters to have had their jobs and finances impacted by the pandemic,” Duncan continued. “Interestingly, the gap between the HPSI broken out by the homeowner and renter subgroups hit a survey high in August but, despite narrowing slightly, remains elevated and well above the survey average.”

                  Read more in-depth here.

                   

                  Economic growth will be better than expected thanks to the resilient services sector, Goldman says*

                  The U.S. economy will recover faster than expected in part because the sectors most susceptible to the most recent coronavirus spread aren’t taking as severe a hit, according to Goldman Sachs.

                  Separate analyses the firm has published over the past several days indicate a fairly strong growth path ahead. GDP in 2021 is projected to increase 5.3% compared to a 2020 drop of about 3.5%.

                  Economists have been worried that the aggressive spread of Covid-19 cases will exact an especially large toll on the battered services industry, but Goldman said data is “so far inconsistent with this view.”

                  “While many services industries saw large declines in activity in the initial stages of the virus, only the most virus-sensitive sectors have shown meaningful sequential declines in November, with most other industries close to or at their peak levels since the start of the pandemic,” Goldman economist David Choi said in a note.

                  “While still early, the data so far suggest that very high levels of virus spread may ultimately translate to a surprisingly small hit to overall activity this time around,” he added.

                   

                  Services make up a huge part of the American economy. While the consumer accounts for about two-thirds of gross domestic product, services account for about 61% of all that spending. However, the level of services expenditures was off about 17% in the third quarter from the same period a year ago.

                  Despite the overall downturn, the services sector has been on the mend, expanding for six straight months. In November, the ISM Services Index registered a 55.9% reading, indicating the level of firms reporting expanded activity. That was below the October level but still in positive territory.

                  Read more in-depth here.

                   

                  How to grow housing market supply in 2021*

                  Deficit financing might be the cure to the housing shortage blues

                  The U.S. housing market was the single best outperforming economic sector globally during the COVID-19 pandemic in 2020. The reasons for that are solid demographics and low mortgage rates, which will not change much in 2021. Due to the solid demand for homes, housing market supply for both new and existing homes are at all-time lows.

                  New Housing Market Supply
                  The monthly supply for new homes is currently at 3.3 months. This matters because builders like to see monthly supply below 6.5 months to have the confidence to continue building. If supply goes over 6.5 months, builders will halt the rate of growth for new construction plans as they did in 2018 and again for a brief period this year.

                  For now, though, the low inventory means housing starts have legs to move higher. Keep this rule of thumb in mind for the future, below 4.3 months; the builders are very excited; from 4.4 -6.4 months, the builders are ok with construction as long as new home sales grow. Above 6.5 months, Houston, we have a problem.

                   

                   

                   

                   

                  Existing Supply
                  Existing housing market supply is also at all-time lows. We had a temporary increase in housing supply due to the lack of activity from COVID-19, which was quickly ended as housing activity picked up after a few weeks.

                  Unsold inventory sits at an all-time-low 2.5-month supply at the current sales pace, down from 2.7 months in September and down from the 3.9-month figure recorded in October 2019.

                  Read more in-depth here.

                   

                  Finding highly affordable leads to keep sales coming in

                  At iLeads, we have many great solutions for mortgage LO’s at a low cost. If you’d like to see how we can help you bring in consistent sales for a great price, give us a call at (877) 245-3237!

                  We’re free and are taking phone-calls from 7AM to 5PM PST, Monday through Friday.

                  You can also schedule a call here.

                  Get Started

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                    Premium Renewal Rates Rise Across Major Commercial Lines: Ivans

                     

                    ileads insurance market minute

                    Welcome to iLeads Insurance Market Minute, where we bring you the latest, most relevant news regarding the insurance market. Last week you were reading COVID-19 Claims Acceptance Lower Than Predicted. This week we’re bringing you:

                     

                    Family offices enter ‘new frontier’ amid pandemic*

                    Like many parts of the insurance space, the new remote workplace has had an impact on the world of family offices and their advisors in the US. During a panel at the Private Risk Management Association’s (PRMA) virtual summit this year, family office experts came together to discuss how advisors can maintain relationships with their clients and other advisors in this environment, how COVID-19 has affected the focus areas for family offices, and what families of wealth value in their advisors as the pandemic continues to unfold.

                    “Much of the insurance brokerage world was set to adapt [to this new normal],” said Shirley Gordon, director, family office and wealth management for G2 Insurance Services. “Family offices, whether they were single or multi-family offices … not so much. Because of the sensitive nature of their work, the families they served and how they liked the family office to be managed – most work only in a brick-and-mortar work environment – their pivot was more difficult.”

                    These offices had to figure out how to communicate with their team members and keep them supported, all while still serving all of the client and business needs that they had to take care of every day, as well as setting up remote work environments where privacy and security were maintained. In fact, cybersecurity has been one of the biggest concerns of family offices. Ensuring that families and employees were working remotely without the risk of their data and systems being compromised had to be addressed quickly, and it appears that this now will be part of normal life for most advisory professions moving forward.

                    Find out more in-depth here.

                     

                    Berkshire Hathaway picks Canadian insurtech to power commercial telematics solution*

                    Ontario-based telematics solutions provider IMS has been selected by Berkshire Hathaway GUARD Insurance Companies for a new commercial fleet insurance program.

                    Berkshire Hathaway GUARD’s new fleet insurance program is called TrackMRI – “MRI” standing for “Monitor, React, Improve.” Powered by IMS’ DriveSync connected car and telematics platform, the solution offers an accessible fleet management portal, device logistics support, data collection, scoring, fleet behavior assessment and program analytics, as well as hands-on customer support to fleet manager customers.

                    IMS will also provide the sensors, which will be installed in Berkshire Hathaway GUARD’s policyholders’ commercial fleet vehicles to gather driver behavior data. The data collected can potentially lead to savings in vehicle maintenance and fuel costs for commercial fleet organizations.

                    “Our fleet manager customers have limited time for research and system or vendor selection, and yet are flooded by technology solutions that only offer a ‘one-size-fits-all’ approach without any real identifiable differentiation,” said Berkshire Hathaway GUARD vice president of commercial auto Mike Hynes. “Through our relationship with IMS, we are helping fleet managers get the commercial insurance telematics solution they want and need with features and functionality that will have direct improvements on fleet management and driver safety, while helping them potentially save money in the process.”

                    Read more in-depth here.

                     

                    Premium renewal rates rise across major commercial lines: Ivans*

                    Premium renewal rates increased month over month in November for business owners policy, general liability, commercial property and workers compensation coverages, while rates decreased for commercial auto and umbrella, according to a report Wednesday from Ivans Insurance Services, a division of Tampa, Florida-based Applied Systems Inc.

                    Commercial property renewal rates rose 5.66% in November, up from 5.52% in October. Business owners policy rates rose 4.68%, up from 4.39% in October, according to Ivans.

                    General liability rates rose 3.43% in November, up from 3.38% in October. Workers compensation rates declined by 1.90%, compared with a decline of 2.78% in October.

                    Commercial auto rates rose 3.93%, compared with 4.43% the previous month. Umbrella rates increased 2.82% after rising 3.78% in October.

                    “The Ivans Index continues to show hardening rates across major lines of business, but with slight softening of rates relative to months prior for commercial auto and umbrella,” Kathy Hrach, vice president of product management at Ivans, said in a statement.

                    Read more in-depth here.

                     

                    Finding highly affordable leads to keep sales coming in

                    At iLeads, we have many great solutions for insurance agents at a low cost. If you’d like to see how we can help you bring in consistent sales for a great price, give us a call at (877) 245-3237!

                    We’re free and are taking phone-calls from 7AM to 5PM PST, Monday through Friday.

                    You can also schedule a call here.

                    Get Started

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